Knight Center graduates contribute to book on energy and politics

Amanda Peterka

Amanda Peterka

Hannah Northey

Hannah Northey

Two graduates of Michigan State University’s Knight Center for Environmental Journalism helped write a book about how shifting politics have affected North Carolina environment and energy policy.

Turning Carolina Red: Reports From the Front of an Energy Culture War represents an innovative way of explaining energy policy in “politically-charged times,” a story with implications for the rest of the country, according to Environment & Energy Publishing.

Among the eight writers who produced the company’s first ebook are MSU graduates Hannah Northey and Amanda Peterka.

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Knight Center grad gets promotion

Andy McGlashen

Andy McGlashen

Knight Center graduate Andy McGlashen (MA ’09) in June became communications director for the Michigan Environmental Council, a nonprofit organization that represents 70 environmental, health and social justice groups at the state Capitol.

McGlashen joined MEC in 2010 and previously was development and communications associate. He replaces Hugh McDiarmid, Jr., who accepted a position with the International Joint Commission.

A former correspondent for MSU’s Capital News Service, McGlashen was the 2009 recipient of the Knight Center’s Rachel Carson Award for Outstanding Graduate Student. His reporting has appeared in newspapers around the state, along with Midwest Energy News, The Daily Climate, Environmental Health News, Great Lakes Echo and other outlets. He also has covered health and medicine for MSU’s media relations office.

McGlashen even has shown some Great Lakes love on national television.

He can occasionally be found playing guitar around Lansing with Uncle Alice and the Gals, a fledgling old-time and bluegrass band that includes Knight Center graduates Alice Rossignol (banjo) and Brian Bienkowski (mandolin), and featured fellow alumnus Jeff Brooks Gillies on dobro before he moved to Colorado.

Knight Center researcher examines cognitive impacts of screen size

Carie Cunningham does research with an eye-tracking machine.

Carie Cunningham does research with an eye-tracking machine.

Doctoral candidate Carie Cunningham, who is part of the Knight Center’s research collaborative, will discuss the impact of viewing screen size on cognition at the National Communication Association Nov. 20-23 in Chicago.

Here is an abstract of her presentation:

As technology evolves, television consumers are acquiring many more viewing options. Gone are the days of a single, stationary television set with limited programming. Today, consumers have many more options in the programming, as well as, how and where those programs can be delivered. Those options include, but are not limited to, a wide variety of viewing devices such as smart phones, laptops, and a host of other electronic devices that heretofore served primarily as game or music players. A common practice in television news is having the exact same video that is seen on television to also be displayed on other media devices like computers or cell phones. This practice assumes a ‘one-­size-fits-all’ effect, where all video players play the same visuals regardless of screen size or viewing distance. This practice of using the same video is assumed to capture attention in the same way despite the different devices.

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Research director on radio panel examining environmental journalism

 

Bruno Takahashi

Bruno Takahashi

Bruno Takahashi discussed the future of environmental journalism recently as part of the Terre Verde program produced by KPFA in Berkeley, Calif.

Takahashi, the research director at Michigan State University’s Knight Center for Environmental Journalism, was part of a panel asked to address: “What place is there for environmental stories in the new, networked, multiplatform, and interactive world of media? How are environmental journalists engaging with the tools of this digital revolution?”

Other panelists included Jason Jaacks of University of California-Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism and Jeff Burnside, president of the board of directors of the Society of Environmental Journalists and an investigative reporter at KOMO 4 (ABC), Seattle.

You can hear the broadcast here.

Putting a news eye in the clear sky

By David Poulson

Students in MSU’s JRN 472 have been practicing shooting video and still images from a drone in WKAR’s Studio A.

The craft has a high definition camera that points outward and another camera that points directly below.

MSU students Juliana Moxley, left, and Carly Giles fly a drone in the journalism class called News eye in the clear sky. Image: Kevin Duffy

MSU students Juliana Moxley, left, and Carly Giles fly a drone in the journalism class called News eye in the clear sky. Image: Kevin Duffy

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Students study use of unmanned aircraft; study applications to reporting on the environment

By David Poulson

Michigan State University environmental journalism students recently observed a practice flight of an unmanned aircraft over a university farm field.

Researchers are preparing to use the craft to analyze the health of grass for a turf management company. The project is undertaken by the university’s Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems program.

The journalism students are studying the applications of such craft – popularly known as drones – and how they can be used to cover environmental news stories.

Related story.

Robert Goodwin, the unmanned aerial systems project manager for MSU's Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems program, explains a training flight to journalism students.

Robert Goodwin, the unmanned aerial systems project manager for MSU’s Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems program, explains a training flight to journalism students. Image: David Poulson

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Get off your butt and report

Members of the Society of Environmental Journalists, wearing floatation vests for safety, interview a Texas Brine representative at the site of the sinkhole. Image: Eric Freeman

Members of the Society of Environmental Journalists, wearing floatation vests for safety, interview a Texas Brine representative at the site of the sinkhole. Image: Eric Freedman

By Eric Freedman

The easy thing for you as a journalist is to phone a few experts and bureaucrats, do some Internet research for background and write a news story or feature about the mega-sinkhole sinkhole near the tiny southern Louisiana community of Bayou Corne.

Or you as a journalist could get off your butt, step away from the computer screen, tuck your cellphone into your pocket and see it up close and personal.

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